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rickng08



Joined: 14 May 2009
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 6:45 am
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I would like to add Tad Williams with memorie, sorrow and thorn.
Dragonbone chair,
stone of farewel
to green angel tower prt 1/ prt2

A really cool storie which starts a bit slow but will catch up quickly. The storie will give you the same feeling as you get while reading lord of the rings. The caracters have different personalities, dept and theres also alot of humour to have. Also a little romance. The big battles are fought outside of the books so youll only know afterwards how the battle ended and how it was fought. Thats the only real disadvantage though.
oh one more thing, the plot...FANTASTIC!!! got me on the wrong foot the whole storie long.
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Prusillus



Joined: 15 Apr 2009
Posts: 133

PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 4:41 pm
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Caleyna wrote:

Juliet Marillier

The Sevenwaters Trilogy
Daughter of the Forest
Son of the Shadows
Child of the Prophesy

Juliet Marillier may be the best author out there right now. Her research is impeccable and her writing is fantastic. This may be a bit on the feminine side for some readers, but I highly recommend it to everyone.


I've been referred to her works by a few others....I'll have to check them out, despite their "feminine side."

I found this online giveaway of the first two Nicholas Flamel books. The third one just came out in stores Stateside.
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A Terrible Beauty



Joined: 14 Jul 2009
Posts: 12
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland.

PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 8:15 am
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I'll give a plug for Michael Moorcock's Elric of Melnibone books. Moorcock seems to have fallen out of favour with fantasy readers over the last two decades, but I still consider him one of the greats, and Elric is certainly an iconic character.

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke is also a classic, in my opinion, even if it will take some time for it to be recognised as such. I love that book to bits!
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Xinpheld
Bird Man of Alka-Seltzer


Joined: 24 Jan 2007
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Location: the bottom of a well

PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:22 am
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I have to second the nomination of Moorcock's Elric books, as well as any other Eternal Champion books you can get a hold of. I have a sizable chunk of the hardback reissues that were printed back in the late 90's/early 00's. Great stuff, and all woven together to make the whole more than its parts.
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victrix



Joined: 10 Jun 2009
Posts: 35
Location: Yorkshire, England

PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:47 am
Post subject: Missing classics
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Looking down these lists (on which there are certainly some fine books) I'm slightly dissapointed not to see Guy Gavriel Kay's name appear anywhere. The man changed my whole image and impression of fantasy. I started with his (to be honest) fairly standard and average trilogy The Fionavar Tapestry while at school. It was eminently readable and had a few nice new ideas that I liked. However, when I started reading his standalone books that are twists on historical periods (Historical Fantasy I believe it is now labelled) they blew me away.

Tigana - the story of a land split between two conquerors, a lost prince and a spell that wiped a name from history. Flavoured with Renaissance Italy and the Ottoman Empire.

A Song For Arbonne - My personal favourite. Hints of Medieval Southern France as Troubadors and assassins get involved in power struggles and blood feuds in an otherwise peaceful land overshadowed by the threat of attack.

The Lions of Al-Rassan - a land split between two warring cultures sees two men from opposing sides drawn into intrigues and finding they've more in common with each other and a young medic girl than with their own peoples. Based loosely on the Spanish Reconquista.

The Sarantine Mosaic - Two book series based on the Byzantine Empire in which a mosaicist travels to the Imperial capital on a great commission and is drawn into the murky political world of the Emperor.

There we go. There are other Kay novels, but if anyone's looking for something different and hasn't read any, enjoy!
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Alle
The First Evil


Joined: 04 Nov 2006
Posts: 1885
Location: Hawaii

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 2:39 pm
Post subject: Re: Missing classics
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victrix wrote:
Looking down these lists (on which there are certainly some fine books) I'm slightly dissapointed not to see Guy Gavriel Kay's name appear anywhere. The man changed my whole image and impression of fantasy.


On the old FFF forum, GGK was indeed listed on the recommendation thread. When we moved to this new set up a few years back, the recommendation thread went missing/ Not everyone (me included!) reposted their recommendations on the new forum. Just a little information for you. Glad you added him...he is one of my very favorite authors.
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Caryla
Lily in Winter


Joined: 16 Jun 2009
Posts: 459
Location: AR

PostPosted: Mon Sep 14, 2009 9:45 am
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Has anyone else read Anne Bishop's The World of the Fae (Tir Alainn Trilogy)? I have only read the first one (The Pillars of the World) which even though maybe I shouldn't, I will admit I only picked up because of reading Sword of Truth--there were people in there called pillars of the world. But it was a fairly good book, I haven't been able to get ahold of the other two books and was wondering if anyone had read them to tell me whether or not it was worth it?
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noviabella08



Joined: 05 Dec 2009
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Dec 05, 2009 9:07 pm
Post subject: Starfist by cragg and sherman
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I´m new to this site and just thought I would start out by recomending a really awesome book I just read, and I would love to hear everyones opinion on it after they read it! it is called Starfist by cragg and sherman, and it is really good, Would make a fun sci fi discussion. you can find it on 411ebooks.net if you want. happy reading!
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ghostthegreat



Joined: 19 Feb 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 12:53 am
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I wanted to find a new book that I could enjoy, tried some I didn't much care for, nothing that really fit a good Fantasy/Adventure type book. But then I stumbled on Ruby of the Realms. I was hesitant at first about a book meant for a middle-grade to YA audience, but then I remembered that I loved Harry Potter so I figured I would give it a try.

I was not disappointed. This debut novel was one of the best I have read in the last year or so. The new world this author created was familiar enough to understand but at the same time completely unique and breathtaking. The only time I was let down was when I reached the end and there was nothing more to read. I can't wait for more from this author!

So to recap, Ruby of the Realms is an awesome book. I bought mine on the barnes and noble website and I think it's probably on amazon as well. I would love to discuss the book with someone if they decided on reading it!
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The White Witch



Joined: 22 Feb 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:46 am
Post subject: Books I'm Reading...
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So I'm pretty busy with school right now so I'm not reading as much as I should be :? ... but this is my (very) short list here:

1. Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
Of course I've read these before a few times but I just watched the movies (I'm late, I know) and so I'm reading them again to refresh my memory. I liked the first movie, but PC was a bit annoying. And why wouldn't you want to relive the magical land of Narnia? :p

2. Need for Magic by Joseph Swope
I'm only partway through this book but it's really interesting so far. My major is psychology and this book incorporates social psych into the story. It's not like reading an educational textbook though, you can know nothing about psychology and still enjoy the book.
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Excalibur



Joined: 16 Feb 2010
Posts: 87
Location: Oklahoma

PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:07 am
Post subject: Acacia
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has anybody read the book Acacia. I just finished it, and I really enjoyed it. It is like george rr martins series, where each chapter switches characters. It doesnt have nearly as many characters viewpoints as his, and is also like Narnia in which the story centers around 4 children of the king but the book is written for adults more. The book is really well written with good prose. If u didnt like game of thrones because main characters got killed off than i would not recommend this book. Its not quite as bad as game of thrones on that aspect though. I didnt think i would like it at first because each chapter goes to a different character. I didnt like game of thrones for that reason, and I nearly finished that book. There was one character that dealt with the mystery of the frozen north, and the dark elf like creatures coming through it. It only got to that a couple times in the book really and all the rest was just politics. There is alot of that in this book too, and the magic is hinted at here and there. There is very good mystery in this book that makes me look forward to the next book to uncover the mysteries of acacia. Normally I dont like alot of character switching but 1/3 way through got absorbed in all the characters stories, and i did not mind it.
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High Wizard of Silvinesh



Joined: 22 Jun 2009
Posts: 66
Location: Beautiful Northern Ontario Canada

PostPosted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 6:22 pm
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Not sure if this is where I should post this or even if any of the book club would be interested, but I will throw this out to see if any of you would want to do a review of my novel, one of these months this summer, to help promote my series. There would be absolutely no costs to the people participating, just looking for some good constructive feedback and maybe peak the interest of others to read my series.

Let me know.

Rodney Scully
Author of The High wizard of Silvinesh
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littlewisp



Joined: 02 Jun 2010
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu Jun 03, 2010 1:09 pm
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Ooooh, book recommendations. I think I have a few to add (more than a few) and doubtless I'll be picking up some of the ones I see here ( a lot I haven't read, so I hope I have some you guys haven't read).

China Mieville

Perdido Street Station
The Scar
Iron Council

Um. Let's start by saying I have a HUGE geekcrush on this man. I was starting to get bored with fantasy. Plots seemed all predictable, and the same rehashed situations of politics, war, creatures, mayhem, leads, whatever. The creativity seemed drained, pale, lifeless. Then one day I picked up Perdido. Oh. My. God. I fell in love. I can't see everyone enjoying this, though. For one, these books are a blend of weird, horror, thriller, fantasy, steam punk and a few others. For two, whether out of conscious ego or just an unconscious grip of the language, the writing is a bit overfull of words gracing the lesser seen pages of a dictionary.

But if you can get past that, holy crap. The things he comes up with. The city is alive. The characters are believable (not the best fleshed characters I've seen, but this is definitely not a character driven story). There are really no standard fantasy races here. Or landscapes. The plot is something you've seen before if you break it down to very basics, but reimagined. . .oh yes, so . . .gahhhh. I've seen some people refer to these as classics (one person even saying that though he didn't like the books, he still acknowledged them as classics). Suffice to say I loved these books. Even if everything sucked but the originality and creativity, they'd still be dear to me.

And I should mention that these three are in the same universe and are interrelated, they do not follow the same characters from book to book. Each is a standalone, but they are definitely a trilogy.

Tim Lebbon

The Island

Fallen

With this guy, I officially became a fan of weird (or new weird, as some call it) fantasy fiction. Again, the creativity in these books flabbergasts me. Lebbon's stories are intense, driven forward by hints of mystery and dire circumstance, so that you plunge into them waiting for secrets to be revealed, and wincing at the knocks taken by the characters throughout. And as you turn the pages, you think to yourself, "Oh no he didn't!" maybe wincing, but I was delighted by the twists and turns. Fair warning, this man does not pull punches.

The two books listed are in the same universe, but that's really all that connects them. He has two more, Dusk and Dawn. .. but I have not read them because it seems I have to order them online. *grumbles* I'll get around to it, I do NOT want to miss them.

And to give you a sense of HOW weird (I know not everyone is into it) his stuff gets, one of the creatures briefly mentioned that I adored was this sort of fleshy tumbleweed rumbling along the plains, that attaches to living creatures and kind of absorbs them into itself. This is definitely not Kansas, or anything so nice as a Wicked Witch of the West.

Caitlin Kiernan

Silk
Murder of Angels

Drugs, rock and roll, a gloomy and dirty urban setting, and creepy crawlies. And then, add a delicate, descriptive style of writing that is addicting, and you've got yourself a great time. Silk is easily one of the best horror experiences I've had, keeping a slick anticipation rolling throughout, all the while keeping you wondering if it's real or fantasy. Tightly written. Murder is not quite as good (Kiernan tries to do too much, and the end sort of left me feeling, 'that's it, really?' . . .but I still enjoyed that gorgeous writing), but still definitely palatable.

Neal Stephenson

Anathem

(and probably all the others)

Uhhhh, wow. Some of it feels fairly pretentious as the author sort of pelts you with words while flaunting that he knows more than you do, but I loved the crap out of it. An original(ish) monk order filled to the brim with philosophy based on our world's own (if you're into philosophy you'll recognize a lot of Greeks who have been mirrored into this fantasy setting), secrets, aliens, and a grand adventure. Some people feel it moves way too slow at the start (it's mostly building the setting) but wow, I loved all of it, especially the setting and the ideas presented.

Patrick Rothfuss

The Name of the Wind

This man knows how to tell a story. I'm sure you've heard this book mentioned before. It's pretty traditional fantasy, but oh my, everything is so well pieced together you won't want it to end. I'm eagerly awaiting the sequel (s), and trying not to drool at the prospect of dipping into this world again.

Barbara Hambly

The Ladies of Mandrigyn
The Witches of Wenshar
The Dark Hand of Magic

It's standard, traditional (but AWESOME) fantasy following a mercenary captain and his second in command through a series of conflicts (rather life threatening, 'conflicts' is sort of an understatement) dealing with sorcery. Lots of action with intrigue. The politics here are less of ruling parties and more of, er, mercenary variety. Great characters. Very entertaining fantasy, nothing necessarily mind blowing but these are some I can read again and again.

CJ Cherryh

The Paladin

What's catchy about Paladin is that it's a distinctively eastern theme without being obnoxious about it, and that the ideals presented within the book are not overbearing. It's a realistic setting that shows the good and the bad without bias, and in a way that becomes so believable you can imagine the story happening somewhere in the past. Cherryh does mostly sci fi with a few ventures into fantasy, but I strongly believe this is one of her best -- if only because though lighter than many of her other books, it has a certain gravity to it that lends it, wait for it, weight. The character development is great, the plot is simple but it doesn't matter because of the emotional and physical journey undertaken by the two mains.

It's one downfall is that it gets confusing towards the end as events start piling on. . .but I wouldn't have it any other way. You won't find complexity here, but I don't feel the book needs it.

Deborah Chester

The Golden One
The Crimson Claw
The Crystal Eye

This is epic sci-fi/fantasy that follows the life's journey of the lead character. Action, politics, intrigue, a wide (but tightly focused in terms of narrator) range of characters, slavery, love, life, death, and a overarching theme of slaves vs despots. Something you might find in other fantasy, with one great exception: there are no humans. Period. Not even a mention. But then again, it doesn't need humans. The characters (even, to an extent, the antagonists) are relatable, realistic, and easily sympathized with.

There are several races present, and they are well imagined. This is a memorable trilogy, and I have read through it several times.
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Stomvi



Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 5
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Jul 12, 2010 10:24 am
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Littlewisp, I totally agree with you on China Mieville.... I've only read Perdido Street Station and The Scar, but absolutely loved them both. As you appear to have such good taste, I've written down some of the other authors you mentioned too :)

George R. R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" series has already been mentioned, I know, but I have to say that, even though it's unfinished, would have to be in my top 3 favourite series. His characters are diverse, imaginative and comprehensively brought to life, the plot is intricate and daring, and the setting is thoroughly thought through and well described.

I loved Stephen Donaldson's "Mordant's Need" series (pretty short, only 2 books)... Don't worry, it's not like his dark "Thomas Covenant" trilogies, which I found pretty depressing. Mordant's Need incorporates a very interesting magical concepts involving the use of mirrors as portals. I love Donaldson's almost poetic writing style and descriptiveness. Great characters, plot, culture and concepts.

Suzanna Clark's "Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell" - Magicians in the time of the Napoleonic wars. Real places and real events, but with the powerful influence of two magicians, a new fictional history is written. Has elements of Jane Austen's style, along with traditional fantasy.


Naomi Novik's "Temeraire"
series actually has a fairly similar pretense to Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell, in that it's set in the Napoleonic wars, but this time the opposing armies all have an airforce of dragons. It's fairly lighthearted but well written and original too.

Although it isn't a series in the same way as most of the others mentioned, Roger Zelazny's series of "Amber" short stories were quite enjoyable, with magic based around travel and communication through the means of decks of cards that link to the people or places represented on them. A lot of the plot revolves around the scheming of a large royal family in a fantasy world that is linked to Earth as we know it. I actually listened to it on audiobook, read by Zelazny himself, along with various sound effects and snippets of music, and quite enjoyed the listen.

There are also several sci-fi series and books that I've read recently and loved (and would love to rave about) but this is probably not the right place...
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Stomvi



Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 5
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Jul 12, 2010 10:27 am
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I should add this, which I copied from my post in the "Jordan, Goodkind, Martin...?" thread, as I am really enjoying it...

I'm currently reading Tad William's "Memory, Sorrow and Thorn" series, which is 4 books long. I've read the series you mentioned by Martin, Goodkind and Jordan and I'm finding that there are definitely some shared elements. Not as epic a series as those, sure, but I'm enjoying it greatly... good solid plotlines, well thought out world and cultures, with a few doses of Martin-esque ruthlessness.
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Big Bubba
Slayer of Unreads


Joined: 04 Nov 2006
Posts: 1104
Location: Maryland, USA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 11, 2010 11:10 pm
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I've been meaning to post for a while that the best book ever written is once again available in English translation:
The Long Ships. You should all read it.

If you don't believe me, this is Michael Chabon's introduction to the book:
Unearthing a Viking treasure

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Laure



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 39
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:39 pm
Post subject: The Last Great Wizard of Yden
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I just finished a book I think some of you might like. The Last Great Wizard of Yden by S.G. Rogers (FYI: She sent me a review copy some time back and all I can say is...wow. :))

Briefly, the story goes like this: young Jon's father disappears the day of his 16th birthday and Jon insists he saw a wizard materialize in the den and drag his dad off. Jon finds his father left him an enchanted ring that whisks him away to this world, Yden, a place his father has "told tales" about his whole life.

Well, Yden turns out to be a strange place, where dragons--and the wizards of the Dragon Clan--have long since died off, but some wizards still walk the town--in disguise, and a deranged leader turns his enemies into all manner of animal when they displease him. Jon has to thread through this confusing world in order to find his father.

I'm not really explaining this well, forgive me. The official synopsis goes like this:
For his sixteenth birthday, all Jon wanted were the keys to the family car. Instead, he got a lousy magic ring…

Artistic prodigy Jon Hansen yearns to fit in, but when he stumbles onto a supernatural kidnapping, his life changes forever. Unfortunately, his search for answers uncovers a magical secret—one that makes Jon a danger to everyone around him.

The Wolf Clan wizard Efysian has been draining the magic from Yden. On a quest for eternal power, he’s willing to kill to feed his addiction. To harness the ultimate source of energy, he travels to Earth. This time, however, he has a persistent witness to his crime.

Can Jon survive long enough to outwit the most evil wizard the magical world has ever known? Or will Efysian add the young wizard to his gruesome collection of trophies?


Anyway, I really think you all would like it. I know I sure did. :) Just thought I'd let y'all know about it. :) I hope you like it too!
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Laure



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 39
Location: USA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:43 pm
Post subject: Michael Moorcock
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Also, just echoing what others have said, :) Yes, I too recommend Michael Moorcock, anything and everything. In my pantheon of favorite authors, he's god. :)
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Lannie
Colonel Chatterbox


Joined: 05 Nov 2006
Posts: 537
Location: BC, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2012 9:18 am
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Just finished book 1 and 2 of a trilogy that I'm really loving. The first book is A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness.

Here's the Amazon description: A richly inventive novel about a centuries-old vampire, a spellbound witch, and the mysterious manuscript that draws them together.

Deep in the stacks of Oxford's Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library. Diana has stumbled upon a coveted treasure lost for centuries-and she is the only creature who can break its spell.

Debut novelist Deborah Harkness has crafted a mesmerizing and addictive read, equal parts history and magic, romance and suspense. Diana is a bold heroine who meets her equal in vampire geneticist Matthew Clairmont, and gradually warms up to him as their alliance deepens into an intimacy that violates age-old taboos. This smart, sophisticated story harks back to the novels of Anne Rice, but it is as contemporary and sensual as the Twilight series-with an extra serving of historical realism.


Most of the description I completely agree with, except for that last line. I think Twilight is crap, but I loved these books! For starters, they are adults! And while it has a romance, romance isn't the plot line. I totally recommend them, especialy if you like historical fiction with your fantasy.

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Caleyna
Queen of Silliness


Joined: 04 Nov 2006
Posts: 1295
Location: Maryland, USA

PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2012 4:46 pm
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That sounds good! I need to get it.
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